[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

Go to more on Medicare or Medicare Drug Program More Senior News at SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

 
 
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Medicare & Medicaid News

Hospitals Serving Elderly Poor More Likely Penalized by Medicare for Readmissions

Medicare reduces payments to penalizes hospitals with high rates of readmissions for pneumonia, heart attack and heart failure; those serving poorest seniors have higher readmission rates

By Valerie DeBenedette, HBNS Contributing Writer

Jan. 7, 2014 - Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), finds a new study in Health Services Research.

The Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) of CMS is intended to reduce the number of preventable hospital readmissions for patients with pneumonia, heart attack or heart failure. Hospitals that readmit too many patients within 30 days of their discharge suffer a cut in their Medicare payments of 3 percent by 2015.

The goal of HRRP is to cut healthcare expenses by ensuring that patients are stable when they leave the hospital and will not need costly readmissions.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

New Medicare Data Show 364 Hospitals Have High Rates Of Overall Readmissions

List of hospitals by state with the best and worst readmission rates reported by Medicare

By Jordan Rau, Capsules, Kaiser Health News

Jan. 6, 2014


 
 

Read the latest news
> Medicare
>
Today's Headlines

 

However, a new study of Medicare in-patient claims and other data has found that being dual eligible - both old enough for Medicare and poor enough for Medicaid - increases the risk of a patient's readmission when the data is adjusted for other risks.

Hospitals with more dual-eligible patients were 24 percent more likely to have readmissions for patients who had heart attacks than hospitals with fewer dual-eligible patients.

Hospitals that treat many dual-eligible patients are more likely to have their payments cut by CMS under the HRRP, said Lane Koenig, Ph.D., president of KNG Health Consulting in Rockville, MD, and an author of the study. Many of these hospitals are not financially healthy, he noted. "While these hospitals are more likely to be hurt, they are also more likely to be struggling financially."

Such hospitals may be in areas with fewer or lower quality primary-care resources, which can increase the likelihood that a newly discharged patient ends up back in the hospital within 30 days.

For certain populations, the community may have a greater effect on whether a given patient is readmitted than the hospital does, said Bradley Flansbaum, DO, MPH, a hospitalist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and a member of the Public Policy Committee of the Society for Hospital Medicine.

"The hospital can do everything right and yet these patients will still come back," Flansbaum said.

According to a spokesperson for the American Hospital Association (which took part in and funded the study), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has contracted with the National Quality Forum to convene a panel evaluating the issue of economic disparities in the calculation of HRRP and how such information should be handled.

Currently, CMS does not take socioeconomic status into account when calculating readmission rates.  It is possible that adjusting HRRP calculations for socioeconomic data could mask disparities in quality of care, Koenig said.

"The counter argument is that by not adjusting it, you may be penalizing hospitals simply because they treat a potentially sicker or more-difficult-to-manage population."

News Source: Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, cfah.org

Research Source: Health Services Research, the official journal of the Academy Health, and published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. on behalf of the Health Research and Educational Trust.

 

Financial Relief for Volkswagen Diesel Owners

You may be eligible for money damages if you owned or leased one of these VW, Porsche or Audi vehicles.

In the major scandal of 2015, Volkswagen cheated you and the world. They rigged diesel emission controls so you, nor regulators, would know how much pollution their cars were adding to our environment.

They were caught and have reserved $7.3 billion to help "make it right" with victims.

If you owned or leased one of these vehicles, contact us now.

 Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney Janicek Law attorneys are actively pursuing these cases against VW. Do Not Wait...

Janicek Law Firm, PC

Free Consultation

(Call toll free)

1-877-795-3425 or Email

Vehicles Involved

VW Jetta (20092015)

VW Jetta SportWagen (20092014)

VW Golf (2010-2015)

VW Golf SportWagen (2015)

VW Beetle (20122015)

VW Passat (2012-2015)

Audi A3 (2010-2015)

VW Touareg (20092016)

Porsche Cayenne (2015)

Audi A6, A7, A8, Q5 Quattro (2016)

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.