SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement  Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

 
 
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

UCLA Study Finds New Way to Select Prostate Cancer Patients for Active Surveillance

Too many men in surveillance programs find their cancer more aggressive than they had assumed – see video

Video: Targeted Prostate Biopsy using MR-Ultrasound Fusion

May 19, 2014 - Too many men with prostate cancer are opting for “active surveillance” and later finding their cancer is more aggressive than earlier assumed. UCLA researchers say they have a better way of determining which patients should be selected for the surveillance program.

More and more men who believe they have low-risk prostate cancer are opting for active surveillance – avoiding immediate treatment and watching for signs of cancer growth with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, digital rectal exams and regular ultrasounds. But the methods used to determine which men should be in active surveillance are being challenged by UCLA researchers who see too many men discovering they have more aggressive cancers than assumed.

The new UCLA study indicates selection of men for active surveillance should be based not on the widely used conventional biopsy, but with a new, image-guided targeted prostate biopsy. The new biopsy method, pioneered by a multi-disciplinary team on the Westwood campus, is now a routine part of the UCLA active surveillance program.

Nearly 400 men are now enrolled in the UCLA Active Surveillance program, the largest in Southern California.

UCLA researchers found that conventional "blind" biopsy failed to reveal the true extent of presumed low-risk prostate cancers, and that when targeted biopsy was used, more than a third of these men had more aggressive cancers than they thought.

Their aggressive cancers were not detected by conventional blind biopsy using ultrasound alone, and the men were referred to UCLA's active surveillance program thinking they were at no immediate risk.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving ADT Should be Counseled to Improve Mental Well-Being

Previous studies have reported cognitive and affective symptoms following ADT, particularly in the elderly

Jan. 24, 2014

What are Chances Your Prostate Cancer Test has been Overdiagnosed? New Tool Can Tell You

Nomogram aims to enable informed decision-making and personalized treatment; a graphical calculating device using patient's age, PSA level and Gleason score

Jan. 11, 2014

Longer Survival of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Using Docetaxel Prompts Data Release

Three-year survival rate of 69 percent when chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at start of standard hormone therapy

Dec. 6, 2013

Carbon Monoxide Prevents Growth in Prostate, Lung Tumors; Enhances Chemotherapy

Opens possibility of new cancer therapy to take advantage of powerful chemotherapy drugs making them more potent and limiting terrible side effects, damage to normal cells

Dec. 4, 2013

Drug Tasquinimod May Improve Survival in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

An oral therapy that activates the body's immune system to fight cancer, also known to block tumor blood vessel growth

Nov. 19, 2013

Overweight Men Much Less Likely to Survive Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

Men who died from prostate cancer were 50% more likely to be overweight or obese at diagnosis

Oct. 30, 2013

Lung, Prostate and Other Cancers Diagnosed by Simple Blood Test, Researchers Say

'we identified compounds that appear to be new screening biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and prognosis'

October 15, 2013

Why Do They Keep Screening 75-Year-Olds for Cancer When They Are Not Supposed To?

As a 75-year-old I have an opinion on this new JAMA study finding docs keep on doing PSA screening for old guys despite the experts advising against it - Oct. 15, 2013

By Tucker Sutherland, editor, SeniorJournal.com

New Urine Test for Prostate Cancer Hailed as Best Ever and Easily Available by Mail

Research shows the two-marker urine test is more effective than PSA test alone, or PSA testing that’s incorporated into a commonly used online tool - the Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator

Sept. 25, 2013

Most Older Men Say They Want Prostate Cancer Test Despite Risks, Task Force Objections

Although experts say middle-aged men should not have routine PSA tests, majority of older men disagree, especially those of higher income, black or had recent test - July 11, 2013


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

The study appears in the May 19, 2014 issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Urology.

The targeted biopsy method, under study at UCLA since 2009, is performed by combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with real-time ultrasound, a method of fusion biopsy, in a device known as the Artemis.

Previous work from UCLA demonstrated the value of the new procedure in finding cancers in men with rising PSA who had negative conventional biopsies. This study is the first to show the value of using it early in the selection process for men interested in active surveillance.

"These findings are important as active surveillance is a growing trend in this country," said study senior author Dr. Leonard Marks, a professor of urology and director of the UCLA Active Surveillance Program.

"It's an excellent option for many men thought to have slow-growing cancers. But we show here that some men thought to be candidates for active surveillance based on conventional biopsies really are not good candidates."

Marks and his team identified 113 men enrolled in the UCLA active surveillance program who met the criteria for having low-risk cancers based on conventional biopsies. Study volunteers underwent an MRI to visualize the prostate and any lesions. That information was then fed into the Artemis device, which fused the MRI pictures with real-time, three-dimensional ultrasound, allowing the urologist to visualize and target lesions during the biopsy.

"Prostate cancer is difficult to image because of the limited contrast between normal and malignant tissues within the prostate," Marks said. "With the Artemis, we have a virtual map of the suspicious areas placed directly onto the ultrasound image during the biopsy. When you can see a lesion, you've got a major advantage of knowing what's really going on in the prostate."

Of the 113 volunteers enrolled in the study, 41 men - or 36 percent - were found to have more aggressive cancer than initially suspected, meaning they were not good candidates for active surveillance. The findings should result in a re-evaluation of the criteria for active surveillance, Marks said.

"We are hesitant now to enroll men in active surveillance until they undergo targeted biopsy," Marks said. "Fusion biopsy will tell us with much greater accuracy than conventional biopsy whether or not they have aggressive disease."

Michael Lewis, 70, of Channel Islands Harbor, had a slightly elevated PSA, but was told after a conventional biopsy that he had no cancer. Six months later, his PSA had jumped 50 percent and he was given another biopsy, which again found no malignancy. A third biopsy showed a tiny amount of cancer, which qualified him for active surveillance at UCLA

However, six months later, as part of this study, a targeted biopsy revealed more cancer in Lewis' prostate than originally suspected. Despite what he thought at first, he had an aggressive tumor.

"It was a shock. No one wants to hear they have cancer," said Lewis, who recently finished stereotactic body radiation therapy at UCLA. "With the targeted biopsy system, we were able to find my cancer early. It might have been missed otherwise – it actually was missed. Before I came to UCLA, I was told I didn't even have cancer. I could have been dead - simple as that. Frankly, I owe my life to UCLA."

Lewis' prognosis is good, Marks said, because the cancer was detected early. Had he continued to receive conventional biopsies, the cancer may have spread before it was detected.

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men aside from skin cancer. An estimated 233,000 new cases of prostate cancer will occur in the United States in 2014. Of those, nearly 30,000 men will die.

"For men initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, MRI-ultrasound confirmatory biopsy including targeting of suspicious lesions seen on MRI results in frequent detection of tumors," the study states. "These data suggest that for men enrolling in active surveillance, the criteria need be re-evaluated to account for the risk inflation seen with targeted prostate biopsy."

On the other hand, Marks said, for men with a negative targeted biopsy, a degree of reassurance is provided that is much greater than that offered by the older, blind biopsy method.

The study was funded by the national Cancer Institute, the Beckman Coulter Foundation, Jean Perkins Foundation and the Steven C. Gordon Family Foundation.

UCLA reports that for more than 50 years, the urology specialists at UCLA have continued to break new ground and set the standards of care for patients suffering from urological conditions. In collaboration with research scientists, UCLA's physicians are pioneering new, less invasive methods of delivering care that are more effective and less costly. UCLA reports to be one of only a handful of urology programs in the country that offer kidney and pancreas transplantation. For more information, visit http://urology.ucla.edu/.

 

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.