SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE • Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid • Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement • Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

New Platelet Blocker Reduces Clots, Artery-Opening Surgery in PAD Patients

Vorapaxar is first in a new class of anti-platelet drugs called PAR-1 antagonists

The illustration shows how P.A.D. can affect arteries in the legs. Figure A shows a normal artery with normal blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the normal artery. Figure B shows an artery with plaque buildup that's partially blocking blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the narrowed artery.

The illustration shows how P.A.D. can affect arteries in the legs. Figure A shows a normal artery with normal blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the normal artery. Figure B shows an artery with plaque buildup that's partially blocking blood flow. The inset image shows a cross-section of the narrowed artery.

More at National Heart Lung Blood Institute

June 20, 2012 - An investigational platelet-blocking drug reduced the rate of dangerous blood clots in the legs and the need for artery-opening surgery in people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Unfortunately, the drug didn't significantly reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke, and those taking the blood thinner had higher rates of serious bleeding incidents.

The new research on vorapaxar was presented in the American Heart Association's Emerging Science Series webinar.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

Older Americans Most at Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease, But Least Aware

American Heart Association offers advice for seniors on avoiding risks, but some, like aging, cannot be fixed - PAD Awareness Month

Sept. 17, 2011

SIR Again Sponsoring ‘Legs for Life’ to Find PAD that Hits Up to 20% of Seniors

September is PAD Awareness Month; promoting screenings for peripheral arterial disease is more common with aging - some free

Sept. 7, 2011

Unique Peripheral Arterial Disease Program Works for Older People in Michigan

University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center helps seniors with PAD leg pain get back on track - see video

Aug. 29, 2011


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

"Much of the focus on PAD therapies has been on lowering patients' risk of heart attack and stroke, but this shows that there can be therapies that reduce limb-threatening blood clots and the need for revascularization procedures in the legs," said Marc P. Bonaca, M.D., M.P.H., Instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., and an investigator with the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) study group.

   

In the study, researchers randomized 3,787 patients with PAD to receive standard care or standard care plus vorapaxar.

Participants were part of the 26,449-patient TRA2P-TIMI 50 trial testing 2.5 milligrams per day (mg/day) of vorapaxar in people with a history of heart attack, stroke or PAD.

 The TRA2P-TIMI 50 trial main results presented earlier this year showed a statistically significant reduction in cardiovascular events including heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular death with vorapaxar.

In this substudy, focused on participants with PAD, 11.3 percent of those taking vorapaxar experienced these major cardiovascular events compared with 11.9 percent of those taking a placebo -- a numeric reduction consistent with the overall trial findings that did not reach statistical significance on its own. However, they found benefits of vorapaxar on limb events.

Compared to those not receiving the drug:
   ●  Fewer vorapaxar patients were hospitalized for blood clots in the limbs
(2.3 percent vs. 3.9 percent).
   ●  Fewer vorapaxar patients required revascularization to restore full
blood flow in narrowed or blocked vessels in the limbs (18.4 percent vs.
22.2 percent).

About Peripheral Arterial Disease

Also called: PAD

"This is the first outpatient therapy that has been shown to reduce the risk of blood clots and the need for artery opening revascularization procedures in the legs in patients with PAD," Bonaca said.

The reduction in both urgent blood clots as well as the need for surgery to treat worsening atherosclerosis suggests that the drug may be working in more than one way.

"The target for this therapy is expressed on platelets but also on cells in the artery walls that are important for normal artery function. The benefits observed may be due to drug activity at both sites," noted Bonaca.

Moderate and severe bleeding was increased in patients on vorapaxar compared to those on standard care (7.4 percent vs. 4.5 percent consistent with the overall trial); however, there was no increase in fatal bleeding.

"For clinicians and researchers, these data show the potential for therapies that can reduce leg problems in patients with PAD rather than just overall cardiovascular risk," Bonaca said.

The investigators are analyzing whether vorapaxar treatment improves circulation in the lower body, or allows patients to walk further without pain due to insufficient blood flow to leg muscles (claudication). All of the PAD patients in the study initially had symptoms of claudication, and either poor leg circulation or a previous vessel-opening procedure.

Merck funded the study that was co-authored by David A. Morrow, M.D., M.P.H., and Eugene Braunwald, M.D.

>> The research is part of the American Heart Association's Emerging
Science Series, a free online webinar presentation. View the webinar at
www.scientificsessions.org/emergingscience.

>> For more information on peripheral artery disease, www.heart.org/pad.

>> More at heart.org and strokeassociation.org

>> About PAD Coalition

 

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.