SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE • Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid • Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement • Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

   
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

Fewer Medicare Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure, Death Rates Stable

Hospitalization rate decline due to fewer patients being hospitalized, rather than a reduction in frequency of HF hospitalizations - see video

Click to JAMA Video

Oct. 19, 2011 - Between 1998 and 2008, heart-failure related hospitalizations declined substantially among elderly Medicare patients, but at a lower rate for black men, according to a study in the October 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Also, 1-year mortality rates declined slightly during this period, but remain high.

"Heart failure (HF) imposes one of the highest disease burdens of any medical condition in the United States with an estimated 5.8 million patients experiencing HF in 2006, according to background information in the article.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

Raising 'Good' Cholesterol Reduces Heart Attack, Stroke Risk in Diabetes Patients

nd, risks of heart attack and stroke increase when 'good' cholesterol levels go down

Oct. 7, 2011

Age and Severity of Heart Failure Associated With Impairment in Verbal Memory

Stable memory function was maintained in patients younger than 63 years

Aug. 8, 2011

Broken Heart Syndrome May be Sudden Killer of  More People Than Assumed

Stress cardiomyopathy often associated with older women who suddenly fall dead after loss of a loved one; new study says this is problem for younger people and men, too - videos below story

July 19, 2011


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

“The risk of developing HF increases with advancing age, and as a result, HF ranks as the most frequent cause of hospitalization and rehospitalization among older Americans. Heart failure is also one of the most resource-intensive conditions with direct and indirect costs in the United States estimated at $39.2 billion in 2010.”

The researchers said, before their study, it was not known whether recent declines in ischemic heart disease and its risk factors have been accompanied by declines in HF hospitalization and mortality.

Their study included data of 55,097,390 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized between 1998 and 2008 with a principal discharge diagnosis code for HF.

Jersey Chen, M.D., M.P.H., of the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., and colleagues sought to identify trends in the HF hospitalization rate and 1-year mortality after HF hospitalization.

The patients were from acute care hospitals in the United States and Puerto Rico.

The average age of HF patients increased from 79.0 years to 79.9 years over the study period. There was a decrease in the proportion of female patients (58.9 percent to 55.7 percent) and increase in the proportion of black patients (11.3 percent to 11.7 percent).

An analysis of the data indicated that there was a relative decline of 29.5 percent of the overall risk-adjusted HF hospitalization rate from 1998 to 2008. Age-adjusted HF hospitalization rates declined over the study period for all race-sex categories, with black men having the lowest rate of decline.

Risk-standardized HF hospitalization rates in 1998 and 2008 varied significantly by state. The decline in this rate was significantly higher than the change in the national rate in 16 states and significantly lower in 3 states (Wyoming, Rhode Island, and Connecticut).

The researchers also found that risk-adjusted 1-year mortality decreased from 31.7 percent to 29.6 percent between 1999 and 2008, a relative decline of 6.6 percent, with substantial variation by state. There were 4 states with a statistically significant decline in 1-year risk-standardized mortality between 1998 and 2008 and 5 states with a statistically significant increase.

The authors add that because of the substantial decline in HF hospitalizations, compared to the rate of 1998, there were an estimated 229,000 HF hospitalizations that did not occur in 2008.

"With a mean HF hospitalization cost of $18,000 in 2008, this decline represents a savings of $4.1 billion in fee-for-service Medicare," the report says.

The authors conclude that the overall decline in HF hospitalization rate was principally due to fewer individual patients being hospitalized with HF rather than a reduction in the frequency of HF hospitalizations.

Also, the substantial geographic variation in HF hospitalization and 1-year mortality rates represent marked differences in outcomes that are not explained by insurance status.

Editorial: Mortality, readmission rate for HF unacceptably high

Mihai Gheorghiade, M.D., of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, and Eugene Braunwald, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, write in an accompanying editorial that "even though the study by Chen et al suggests that rates of HF hospitalization may have declined in recent years, the overall mortality rate and readmission rate for HF continue to remain unacceptably high."

"New approaches for patients hospitalized for HF must be developed and implemented. Given the differences in hospitalizations for HF based on race and region noted by Chen et al, further exploration is required. A more in-depth and longitudinal characterization of this patient population is necessary to help shape future team-based management strategies."

 

 

 

 

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.