[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

   
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

Raising 'Good' Cholesterol Reduces Heart Attack, Stroke Risk in Diabetes Patients

And, risks of heart attack and stroke increase when 'good' cholesterol levels go down

Oct. 7, 2011 - Increasing levels of high-density lipoproteins, better known as HDL or "good" cholesterol, reduced the risk for heart attack and stroke among patients with diabetes. That's according to a new study appearing online today in The American Journal of Cardiology.

The observational study, one of the largest of its kind, examined the medical records of more than 30,000 patients with diabetes and also found that patients whose HDL levels decreased had more heart attacks and strokes.

Researchers studied patients with diabetes because they are more prone to heart disease with a lifetime risk as high as 87 percent, according to a paper from the landmark Framingham heart study published 2008.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

Dieting Beats Exercise for Diabetes Prevention in Older Women, Combo Is Best

Strengthening exercise appears to have greater benefits for insulin resistance than aerobic exercise

Sept. 2, 2011

Older Diabetes Patients with Very Low Glucose Have Slightly Higher Risk of Death

Well controlled blood sugar level lowers risk of heart attack, amputation, kidney disease

April 18, 2011

Senior Citizens Lead the Way as Diabetes Spreads to 26 Million in New U.S. Estimate

Estimates in U.S. have risen since CDC estimated in 2008 that 23.6 million (7.8) had diabetes and 57 million adults had prediabetes

Jan. 27, 2011

Older Women with Diabetes and Depression Have Twice the Risk of Death

Both problems linked to unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle

Jan. 3, 2011


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

While there is considerable evidence that reducing the amount of low-density lipoprotein, also known as LDL or "bad" cholesterol, can reduce the risk of heart disease, the relationship between HDL cholesterol and heart disease is less clear.

"Our study adds to the growing body of evidence that raising HDL levels may be an important strategy for reducing heart attack risk," said study lead author Gregory Nichols, PhD, senior investigator with the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore.

"This is promising news for patients with diabetes, who already have an increased risk for heart problems. Raising their good cholesterol may be one more way for these patients to reduce their risk," said Suma Vupputuri, PhD, co-author and investigator with the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Atlanta.

Senior citizens - Heart disease, stroke and diabetes

   ● In 2004, heart disease was noted on 68% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.

   ● In 2004, stroke was noted on 16% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.

   ● Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes.

   ● The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes.

American Diabetes Association

The study included 30,067 patients who entered Kaiser Permanente diabetes registries in Oregon, Washington and Georgia between 2001 and 2006.

These patients had at least two HDL cholesterol measurements between 6 and 24 months apart.

Most patients (61 percent) had no significant change in HDL levels; in 22 percent of patients, HDL levels increased by at least 6.5 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter of blood); in 17 percent of patients, HDL levels decreased by at least that same amount.

After obtaining the cholesterol measurement, researchers followed the patients for up to 8 years to see if they were hospitalized for a heart attack or stroke.

Patients whose HDL levels increased had 8 percent fewer heart attacks and strokes than patients whose HDL levels remained the same, while patients whose HDL levels decreased had 11 percent more heart attacks and strokes.

This study was observational so there was no intervention to change HDL levels, and although many patients were on statins to reduce their "bad" cholesterol, very few were on medications to improve HDL.

Past Studies Inconclusive

Past studies on this topic have reached contradictory conclusions. A study published in 2009 in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that for every 5 mg/dl improvement in HDL cholesterol level patients saw a 21 percent decrease in heart attack risk. But a systematic review of more than 100 clinical trials published in the British Medical Journal in 2009 found that increasing HDL cholesterol did not reduce the risk of heart disease or death.

Earlier this year the National Institutes of Health stopped a clinical trial using large doses of the B Vitamin niacin to boost HDL levels because the patients, who were already taking statins to reduce their "bad" cholesterol, saw no added reduction in heart attacks when they added niacin. Niacin is one of very few medications to increase HDL, but it can also have side effects such as flushing, vomiting, dizziness and itching.

People can raise their HDL levels without medication by keeping their weight down, changing their diet, avoiding tobacco smoke, and increasing exercise. Medical experts believe that HDL or "good" cholesterol carries the "bad" cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver where it is processed and passed from the body.

According to the American Diabetes Association, a good target for women should be at least 50 mg/dl of HDL and for men at least 40 mg/dl. Levels of 60 mg/dl or higher are thought to protect against heart disease.

The study was funded by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, which makes a diabetes medication called Actos (pioglitazone) that other studies have shown modestly raises HDL. Authors include Gregory A. Nichols, PhD, and A. Gabriela Rosales, MS, from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., and Suma Vupputuri, PhD, at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Atlanta.

About the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

The Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, founded in 1964, is a nonprofit research institution dedicated to advancing knowledge to improve health. It has research sites in Portland, Honolulu, and Atlanta. (http://www.kpchr.org)

 

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.