[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

   
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

Age and Severity of Heart Failure Associated With Impairment in Verbal Memory

Stable memory function was maintained in patients younger than 63 years

Aug. 8, 2011 - Older patients those age 63 or older - with lower rates of left ventricular ejection fraction (a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps with each contraction) appear more likely than younger patients to have significantly reduced verbal memory function, according to a report in the August issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Three decades ago, researchers began investigating the association of heart failure with cognitive decline, according to background information in the article.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

Researchers Find Almost Half with Heart Failure Also Have Memory, Cognitive Problems

Cognitive impairment also closely related to the severity of symptoms or left ventricular dysfunction

Feb. 5, 2009


Neighborhood Status Influences Cognitive Ability of Older Women

Non-whites most vulnerable to the effects of living in lower socioeconomic status; income level nor education makes a difference

Aug. 2, 2011

Low Health Literacy Associated With Higher Rate of Death Among Heart Failure Patients

Low health literacy patients were older, of lower socioeconomic status and less likely to have a high school education; also more likely to have multiple chronic diseases - watch video

April 26, 2011


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

Thirty to 80 percent of patients with heart failure may experience some cognitive deficits. However, research seeking to clarify the correlation of cognitive impairment with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), a measurement of the severity of heart failure, has produced inconsistent results.

"Conflicting evidence about the association of EF with cognitive function suggests a complex relationship between patient variables and the cardiovascular factors that influence cognition," write the authors.

Joanne R. Festa, Ph.D., from St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between age, EF and memory among patients with heart failure.

The participants, all adult patients with heart failure, underwent neurocognitive assessment while being evaluated for potential heart transplantation candidacy between September 2006 and September 2008.

The testing included verbal and visual memory, attention, executive functioning and self-reported depressive symptoms. Researchers also recorded participants' EF, heart failure cause, medical history, current medications and demographic information. Echocardiography was used to measure EF, which was scored at less than 30 percent or at 30 percent or greater.

Age quartiles used by the researchers were
   ● 45 years or younger,
   ● 46 to 55 years,
   ● 56 to 62 years and
   ● 63 years or older.

A total of 207 participants were included in the final analysis of the study; 38 had an EF of 30 or greater, and 169 had an EF of less than 30.

Stable memory function was maintained across EF levels in patients younger than 63 years, but in older patients a significant association with worse memory performance was noticed when EF was less than 30 percent.

Analysis of the results demonstrated that the components of memory with which low EF had the greatest association were verbal delayed recall and recognition.

"In summary, an interaction exists between the age and EF such that older patients with low EF had significantly reduced memory, particularly verbal delayed recall and recognition," write the researchers. However, the association of low EF with "memory in these patients is not entirely explained by EF."

The authors suggest further research into additional mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in patients with heart failure.

This research was supported by the Nathaniel Wharton Fund and by a grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.