SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement  Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Health & Medicine or More Senior News from SeniorJournal.com on the Front Page

   

E-mail this page to a friend!

Health & Medicine for Senior Citizens

Rising PSA Levels May Sometimes Lead to Negative Biopsies But Usually Means Cancer

News study shows nearly 70 percent with rising PSA eventually get prostate cancer

May 18, 2011 - A man's rising PSA (prostate-specific antigen) level over several years – which had been seen as a possible warning sign of prostate cancer – has recently come under fire as a screening test because it sometimes prompts biopsies that turn out to be normal. That’s true, the study shows, but most are headed for prostate cancer.

 

Related Archive Stories

 
 

New Surgery-Free Treatment for Enlarged Prostate Avoids Sexual Dysfunction

Prostatic artery embolization as effective as popular TURP surgical method; more than half of senior men have enlarged prostate; also silodosin a new treatment for prostatitis

May 18, 2011

Study Finds Way to ID Aggressive Prostate Cancers; Save Men from Aggressive Therapy

Many prostate cancer patients treated unnecessarily; vast majority would not become life-threatening, even if left untreated

Feb. 3, 2011

Substantial Improvement in Prostate Cancer PSA Testing Discovered by Genetics Firm

Better results will prevent unnecessary biopsies, catch more cancers, says deCODE

Dec. 16, 2010

Older Men with Low Baseline PSA Do Not Benefit from Early Prostate Cancer Detection

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the third leading cause of death from cancer in men in Western countries

Sept. 13, 2010


 
 

Read the latest news
> Health & Medicine
>
Today's Headlines

 

The new study shows nearly 70 percent of men who had rising PSA levels and subsequent normal biopsies were eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to research from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. The trend of a PSA level over several years is called PSA velocity.

"Our findings show an elevated and rising PSA level or velocity should lead a clinician to follow a patient more closely, even if he has a negative biopsy," said lead investigator William Catalona, M.D., director of the clinical prostate cancer program at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University.

"One negative biopsy isn't the end of the road."

The findings were presented May 18 at the American Urological Association 2011 Annual Meeting. Catalona is a professor of urology at the Feinberg School and a urologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

PSA is a substance whose elevated levels can indicate prostate cancer but can also be caused by prostate inflammation or enlargement or other conditions. Catalona, known as the father of the PSA screening, was the first to show in 1991 that a simple blood test measuring PSA levels could be used to detect prostate cancer.

For the study, Northwestern researchers looked in their database at the history of 97 patients with a rising PSA trend (or velocity) who had a subsequent negative biopsy. Researchers found 66 percent of patients were eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer, 20 percent had a benign prostate, 8 percent had protatitis and 6 percent had premalignant lesions.

"This underscores the importance of using a patient's individual PSA trend when deciding whether to pursue a prostate biopsy," said co-investigator Gregory Auffenberg, M.D., a resident in urology at the Feinberg School. "It's not enough to only look at an individual PSA value when historical data is also available."

"Although specific recommendations regarding PSA screening vary, there is general agreement that men should be informed about the potential risks and benefits of PSA screening before being tested," according to the National Cancer Institute.

Currently, Medicare provides coverage for an annual PSA test for all men age 50 and older.

The research was supported in part by the Urological Research Foundation, Prostate SPORE Grant and a Lurie Cancer Center grant.


What is the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test?
National Cancer Institute

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by cells of the prostate gland. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in the blood. The doctor takes a blood sample, and the amount of PSA is measured in a laboratory. Because PSA is produced by the body and can be used to detect disease, it is sometimes called a biological marker or a tumor marker.

It is normal for men to have a low level of PSA in their blood; however, prostate cancer or benign (not cancerous) conditions can increase a man’s PSA level. As men age, both benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer become more common. The most frequent benign prostate conditions are prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (enlargement of the prostate). There is no evidence that prostatitis or BPH causes cancer, but it is possible for a man to have one or both of these conditions and to develop prostate cancer as well.

A man’s PSA level alone does not give doctors enough information to distinguish between benign prostate conditions and cancer. However, the doctor will take the result of the PSA test into account when deciding whether to check further for signs of prostate cancer.

Doctors’ recommendations for screening vary. Some encourage yearly screening for men over age 50, and some advise men who are at a higher risk for prostate cancer to begin screening at age 40 or 45. Others caution against routine screening. Although specific recommendations regarding PSA screening vary, there is general agreement that men should be informed about the potential risks and benefits of PSA screening before being tested.

Currently, Medicare provides coverage for an annual PSA test for all men age 50 and older.

>> More by National Cancer Institute

>> More about PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)

>> Many links to archived reports in SeniorJournal.com can be found with this news report: New Surgery-Free Treatment for Enlarged Prostate Avoids Sexual Dysfunction

 

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

 

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.