SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement  Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Features for Senior Citizens or More Senior News on the Front Page

 
 
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Features for Senior Citizens

Doc-in-a-Box Retail Medical Clinics Booming with Growth in Senior Citizen Patients

Seniors using these neighborhood clinics now almost 20% of all traffic

Clinic in Super Target in MinnesotaAug. 16, 2012 - Fast-growing retail medical clinics are attracting senior citizen patients and delivering more preventive care, particularly flu shots and other vaccinations, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation.

Researchers found that visits to retail medical clinics increased four-fold from 2007 to 2009, with the proportion of patients over age 65 growing from 8 percent to 19 percent of all visits during this period.

More than 44 percent of visits to the clinics occurred on the weekend or other hours when physician offices typically are closed, suggesting retail clinics meet a need for convenient care, according to the study published online as a Web First by the journal Health Affairs.

 

Related Stories

 
   Walmart Wants To Be Nation's Biggest Primary Care Provider, Lower Cost

Giant retailer has goal to ‘dramatically ... lower the cost of healthcare’

By Julie Appleby and Sarah Varney

Nov. 10, 2011


Doc-in-a-Box Retail Clinics Popping Up in the Best of Neighborhoods, Not Underserved

States with large elderly populations lead in locations – Florida, California, Texas, Illinois and Georgia

May 26, 2009


Survey Finds Patients Satisfied with Healthcare Found in Retail Store Health Clinics

Biggest driver of satisfaction is convenience, which is expected to draw senior citizens

May 23, 2008


States Begin Regulating In-Store Health Clinics Amid Safety Concerns

American Medical Association initiated concern says WSJ

Aug. 9, 2007


Medical Association Decides Against a Ban on Retail Health Clinics but Wants Governments to Investigate

AMA to launch own investigations of how prescriptions are handled

June 26, 2007


Docs Not Wanting to Give Shot in the Arm to Booming Retail Health Clinics

Many at AMA convention want them banned, but is it the competition

June 25, 2007


Wal-Mart to Change Landscape of Healthcare with Addition of Health Clinics

400 to open in three years, 2,000 in five to seven years

April 25, 2007


In-Store Health Clinics Grow as Does Satisfaction but Not Customers

Survey finds users are well satisfied with the experience

April 18, 2007


Senior Citizens May Soon Find Healthcare in their Pharmacy or Grocery

Retail health clinics expected to mushroom across the country

August 24, 2006


Read more Features for Senior Citizens

 

"Retail medical clinics continue to grow rapidly and attract new segments of users," said lead author Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and a researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. "They remain just a small part of outpatient medical care, but appear to have tapped into patients' needs."

While retail clinics have begun promoting new services such as caring for chronic illnesses such as diabetes, it remains uncertain whether demand for the clinics will continue to grow as the federal Affordable Care Act is enacted.

"If demand for primary medical care drives longer wait times to see a doctor as it has following health care reform in Massachusetts, then this could drive greater demand for convenient alternatives such as retail clinics," Mehrotra said.

The study is the latest in a series of reports from RAND Health that has documented the rapid growth of retail medical clinics, which are located in drug stores or other retail businesses. The clinics typically are staffed by nurse practitioners and offer basic types of health care at clearly posted prices.

Physician groups have expressed concern that retail clinics could disrupt patients' relationships with their primary care physicians and interrupt continuity of care. The criticism has increased since some clinic operators began offering care for chronic illnesses such as asthma and high blood pressure.

Researchers examined the latest trends in the use of retail medical clinics by analyzing information from 2007 through 2009 obtained from the three largest retail clinic operators, which account for 81 percent of the clinics operated nationally. Trends in usage were compared to earlier findings from 2000 to 2006.

Visits to retail clinics reached 5.97 million in 2009, up from 1.48 million in 2007. But retail clinics still account for only a small slice of outpatient medical care when compared to the estimated 117 million emergency room visits and 577 million visits to doctors' offices made each year.

Visits to retail medical clinics for vaccinations increased sharply from 2007 to 2009, researchers found. Another recent study published by RAND researchers found that vaccination visits to the three major retail clinic chains quadrupled to more than 1.9 million in 2009. Most of the inoculations given were for influenza.

"The number of vaccinations provided at retail clinics could grow even larger if providers started counseling patients about the need for inoculations when they visit the clinics for other care," said Lori Uscher-Pines, an associate policy researcher at RAND.

In the latest study, researchers found that the proportion of retail clinics visits made for acute medical problems dropped from 78 percent to 51 percent. There was a corresponding increase in visits for preventive care, making up more than 47 percent of visits by 2009. The study does not capture the impact of a push made by retail medical clinic operators beginning in 2010 to increase the services offered for chronic illnesses.

The proportion of patients who reported that they did not have a primary care physician remained at more than 60 percent, although researchers had expected the number to drop as use of the clinics increased. They say it is possible that patients with no or weak relationships with a primary care physician are more likely to seek care at a retail clinic than patients with strong relationships with a physician.

Support for the studies was provided by the California HealthCare Foundation, a nonprofit philanthropy based in Oakland, Calif. Other authors of the studies are Judith Lave, Katherine Harris and Rachel Burns.

RAND Health, a division of the RAND Corporation, is the nation's largest independent health policy research program, with a broad research portfolio that focuses on health care costs, quality and public health preparedness, among other topics.

Nursing Home Abuse,
Medical Malpractice -
Experienced Legal Help

 Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney Janicek Law attorneys are working every day to help senior citizens and others harmed by failure of care in nursing homes and the healthcare system.

If you or a loved one have suffered due to the neglect or inadequate care of others, call us today. We offer the skill and knowledge gained in more than twenty years of success.

Free Consultation - Call toll free 1-877-795-3425 or Email

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.