SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement  Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to Alzheimer's, Dementia & Mental Health or More Senior News on the Front Page

 
 
Follow on  and 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Alzheimer's, Dementia & Mental Health

Early Vascular Disease Therapy May Delay or Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s

In a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular disease affecting circulation of blood in the brain was significantly associated with dementia

Link with vascular disease was strongest with Alzheimer's disease

July 15, 2013 - The early management of vascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, and adopting a 'heart healthy' diet as well as exercise and other lifestyles in midlife may delay or prevent the onset of dementia due to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, suggests a recent study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

They found that across a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular disease affecting circulation of blood in the brain was significantly associated with dementia. The researchers contend that people already exhibiting clinical features of Alzheimer's disease and other memory impairments may benefit from effective therapies currently available to reduce vascular problems.

The link between cerebrovascular disease was strongest with Alzheimer's disease – as compared to other neurodegenerative diseases including frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS and Parkinson's disease. It also had the most pronounced effect in younger Alzheimer's patients, according to the study, published in the July 10 issue of Brain.

 

Related Stories

 

 

It May Not Be Amount of Plaque in Brain but Where It Builds That Can Predict Cognitive Decline

Relatively early accumulation of plaques in temporal lobe was associated with cognitive decline

July 15, 2013

Plan to Address Cognitive Health As Public Health Issue Released by Alzheimer's Association, CDC

Follows recent update of national plan to address Alzheimer's by Department of Health and Human Services

July 15, 2013

Frequent Falls Seem to be Early Warning of Alzheimer’s, Cognitive Decline for Seniors

Study confirms earlier research showing movement changes older people precede cognitive decline in early Alzheimer’s or mild cognitive impairment

July 2, 2013


Read the latest news on Alzheimer's, Dementia & Mental Health

 

"While there was evidence already to suggest that vascular disease could play a role in neurodegenerative disease, this is the first study to compare the burden of vascular disease across neurodegenerative diseases with multiple, distinct or different origins," said senior author John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, director of the National Institute on Aging-funded Alzheimer's Disease Core Center at the University of Pennsylvania and professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

"We were surprised to find such a strong link to vascular disease in Alzheimer's disease, especially in younger patients, in comparison to individuals with other neurodegenerative diseases."

Penn researchers analyzed 5,715 cases from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database, which have been collected from 35 past and present NIA-funded Alzheimer’s centers across the US since NACC was started in 1999. This is the first study to compare the presence of cerebrovascular disease across the whole spectrum of neurogenerative diseases.

Nearly 80 percent of the more than 4,600 Alzheimer's disease patients showed some degree of vascular pathology – defined as hardened or blocked blood vessels, tissue death due to lack of blood supply, or bleeding – in the brain, as compared to 67 percent in the control group of people with no remarkable brain disease pathology, and 66 percent in the Parkinson's pathology group. 

"In the absence of any disease modifying therapies  to change the course of the Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, we hope that the diligent use of existing treatments for vascular conditions and the implementation of campaigns promoting healthy lifestyles in young and middle aged people may have a positive impact on preventing or reducing dementia symptoms in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease " said lead study author Jon B. Toledo, MD, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

The study has implications from a public health perspective and for the design of clinical study cohorts that better represent the general population of people with cognitive impairment. In addition, drugs tested for Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias should consider the impact of the frequent concident presence of cerebrovascular disease on the treatment response of new therapies for Alzheimer’s, as most current trials exclude patients with vascular risk factors or cardiovascular disease. Given the prevalence of vascular problems, the researchers note that this large subset of dementia patients should be included in clinical trials to accurately represent the true population dealing with these neurodegenerative diseases, or, at least considered when predicting the clinical impact on patients in a real world population.

Additional members of the Penn study team include Steven Arnold, MD, co-director of Penn's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center and Murray Grossman, MD, EdD, director of the Penn Frontotemporal Disease Center; Kevin Raible and Johanness Brettschneider from the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research; and Sharon Xie, from the Department of Biostatics and Epidemiology. Colleagues at the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center at the University of Washington also contributed to this report.

Funding was provided by the National Institute on Aging (U01 AG016976 and P30 AG010124), with additional support from the Fundacion Alfonso Martin Escudero.

Related Links

Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania Health System

 

Financial Relief for Volkswagen Diesel Owners

You may be eligible for money damages if you owned or leased one of these VW, Porsche or Audi vehicles.

In the major scandal of 2015, Volkswagen cheated you and the world. They rigged diesel emission controls so you, nor regulators, would know how much pollution their cars were adding to our environment.

They were caught and have reserved $7.3 billion to help "make it right" with victims.

If you owned or leased one of these vehicles, contact us now.

 Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney Janicek Law attorneys are actively pursuing these cases against VW. Do Not Wait...

Janicek Law Firm, PC

Free Consultation

(Call toll free)

1-877-795-3425 or Email

Vehicles Involved

VW Jetta (2009–2015)

VW Jetta SportWagen (2009–2014)

VW Golf (2010-2015)

VW Golf SportWagen (2015)

VW Beetle (2012–2015)

VW Passat (2012-2015)

Audi A3 (2010-2015)

VW Touareg (2009–2016)

Porsche Cayenne (2015)

Audi A6, A7, A8, Q5 Quattro (2016)

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

     Back to Top

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.