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Alzheimer's, Dementia & Mental Health

Releasing Growth Hormone Improves Cognitive Ability of Seniors, Even if Impaired

Growth hormone-releasing hormone (tesamorelin) may promote brain health in normal aging

Aug. 6, 2012 – Taking a hormone that releases growth hormone will boost the cognitive ability of senior citizens – even those suffering from mild cognitive impairment, according to a clinical trial reported Online First by Archives of Neurology, a JAMA Network publication.

“Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 have potent effects on brain function, their levels decrease with advancing age, and, they likely play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease,” the authors write as background information on the study.

To examine the effects of GHRH on cognitive function in healthy older adults and in adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Laura D. Baker, Ph.D., of the University of Washington School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, and colleagues, conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which participants self-administered daily injections of tesamorelin (Egrifta) - a form of human GHRH - or a placebo.

 

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The researchers enrolled 152 adults ranging in age from 55 to 87 years (average age, 68 years) and 137 participants (76 healthy patients and 61 patients with MCI) successfully completed the study. At baseline, at 10 and 20 weeks of treatment, and after a 10-week washout (30 weeks total), the authors collected blood samples and administered parallel versions of cognitive tests.

Among the original 152 patients enrolled in the study, analysis indicated a favorable effect of GHRH on cognition, which was comparable in adults with MCI and healthy older adults.

Analysis among the 137 patients who successfully completed the trial also showed that treatment with GHRH had a favorable effect on cognition among both groups of patients. Although the healthy adults outperformed those with MCI overall, the cognitive benefits relative to placebo was comparable among both groups.

Treatment with GHRH also increased insulin-like growth factor 1 levels by 117 percent, which remained within the physiological range, and increased fasting insulin levels within the normal range by 35 percent in adults with MCI but not in healthy adults.

“Our results replicate and expand our earlier positive findings, demonstrating that GHRH administration has favorable effects on cognitive function not only in healthy older adults but also in adults at increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia,” the authors conclude.

“Larger and longer-duration treatment trials are needed to firmly establish the therapeutic potential of GHRH administration to promote brain health in normal aging and ‘pathological aging.’”

In July of 2011, Brown gave an earlier report on her work to attendees at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease. She said that tesamorelin improved several measures of cognitive function in cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals in a placebo-controlled trial. Scores on standard tests of executive function and verbal memory were significantly higher in participants given tesamorelin, according to a report in MedPage Today.

And, a 2006 clinical trial with GHRH reportedly found small but significant improvements in cognitive test scores in healthy older adults. And, in animal studies, it improved biomarkers of brain function and performance on cognition tests.

Tesamorelin and placebo were provided at no cost to the study by Theratechnologies, Inc. This research was supported by National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Aging grants, and by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. A portion of the work was conducted through the Clinical Research Center Facility at the University of Washington Medical Center, which is supported by a National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources grant.

 

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