SeniorJournal.com - Daily News for Senior Citizens

  FRONT PAGE Aging • Health • Alzheimer's - Mental • Nutrition • Medicare & Medicaid Politics  • Fitness  • Social Security • Alerts • Sex Health • Features • Retirement  Elder Care  >Search  >Senior Links

[NavBar.htm]

Senior Journal: Today's News and Information for Senior Citizens & Baby Boomers

More Senior Citizen News and Information Than Any Other Source - SeniorJournal.com

• Go to more on Longevity & Statistics for Senior Citizens or More Senior News on the Front Page

 
 

E-mail this page to a friend!

Senior Citizen Longevity & Statistics

U.S. Losing Ground in Longevity Race; Poor Live Five Years Less Than Affluent

Longevity flattening out in U.S. despite heavy healthcare spending; falling behind others due to shorter lifespan for poorest citizens

By Amy Hodges, Rice University

June 21, 2012 - Despite modest gains in lifespan over the past century, the United States still trails many of the world’s countries when it comes to life expectancy, and its poorest citizens live approximately five years less than more affluent persons, according to a new study from Rice University and the University Colorado at Boulder.

The study authors reviewed data from 1930 through 2000 to identify trends in mortality over time and forecast life expectancy to the year 2055.

Although the researchers found that the U.S. can expect very moderate gains in coming years (less than an additional three years through 2055), the U.S. still trails its developed counterparts in life expectancy.

 

Related Stories

 
 

Senior Citizens Live Longer Taking Vitamin D with Calcium: Large Study

Increased longevity for elderly won’t happen with vitamin D alone says largest study ever

June 15, 2012

Those Long Telomeres Inherited from an Older Father Give You Longevity

Short telomeres a cause of ill health that occurs with aging — long telomeres promote slower aging

June 13, 2012

Centenarians Match Boomers in Daily Exercise; Favorites are Walking, Muscle Building

100 year olds eat and sleep better than baby boomers; consider social connections a key to quality life

June 12, 2012


Senior Citizens See More Time Added to Life Expectancy in New CDC Report

Photo by Michael McLaughlin for "Puzzle of the Century," Smithsonian magazine, Jan. 2003.Life expectancy at birth in 2009 Jumps to 78.2 years, death rates in US hit all time low - March 17, 2011


Read more Longevity & Statistics on Senior Citizens

 

For example, the average life expectancy in the U.S. for a person born today is is 78.49, which is significantly lower than people born in Monaco, Macau and Japan, which have the three highest life expectancies (89.68, 84.43 and 83.91 years, respectively).

In addition, the most deprived U.S. citizens tend to live five years less than their more affluent countrymen, according to Justin Denney, Rice assistant professor of sociology, who was principal author for the study.

Life expectancy rose from 59.95 in 1930 to 77.1 in 2000

Denney said that in 1930, average life expectancy in the United States was 59.85. By 2000, it rose to 77.1 years. “But when broken down, these numbers show that those gains were mostly experienced between 1930 the 1950s and 1960s,” he said. “Since that time, gains in life expectancy have flattened out.

“During periods of expansion in length of life, a similar expansion has occurred between more and less advantaged groups – the rich get richer, the poor get poorer, inequality grows and life expectancy is dramatically impacted,” Denney said.

“And despite disproportionate spending on health care, life expectancy in the U.S. continues to fall down the ladder of international rankings of length of life. It goes to show that prosperity doesn’t necessarily equal long-term health.”

Denney said many of the chronic conditions that have led to smaller gains in life expectancy are more easily treated when people are more financially stable. He said the study shows “the ugly side of inequality,” and he hopes it will draw attention to the fact that more needs to be done to address stagnating life expectancies in the U.S. and eliminate inequalities in the U.S.

“Even in uncertain times, it is important to look forward in preparing for the needs of future populations,” Denney said.

“The results presented here underscore the relevance of policy and health initiatives aimed at improving the nation’s health and reveal important insight into possible limits to mortality improvement over the next five decades.”

The study, “Stagnating Life Expectancies and Future Prospects in an Age of Uncertainty,” used time-series analysis to evaluate historical data on U.S. mortality from the Human Mortality Database.

The paper was co-authored by Robert McNown, Richard Rogers and Steven Doubilet at the University of Colorado-Boulder.

Their research will be published in an upcoming issue of Social Science Quarterly.

Rice University and the University of Colorado-Boulder funded this study.

>> amy.hodges@rice.edu

>> CDC on Life Expectancy

>> CDC Report: Health, United States, 2011

> Medical Malpractice,

> Nursing Home Abuse,

> Personal Injury

Our Experienced Lawyers Can Help

Beth Janicek, Board Certified Personal Injury Attorney"We win because we care, we prepare and we have no fear," Beth Janicek, board certified personal injury attorney

 

Free Consultation on your case.

Call Now Toll Free

1-877-795-3425

or Send Email

More at our Website

 

 

Search for more about this topic on SeniorJournal.com

Google Web SeniorJournal.com

Keep up with the latest news for senior citizens, baby boomers

Click to More Senior News on the Front Page

Copyright: SeniorJournal.com

    

 

Published by New Tech Media - www.NewTechMedia.com

Other New Tech Media sites include CaroleSutherland.com, BethJanicek.com, SASeniors.com, DrugDanger.com, etc.